Earthworks and… comics?

I am an archaeological illustrator who regularly creates drawings and paintings for various kinds of public outreach projects. Several years ago, I began using comics as a medium for visual explanation of all kinds of archaeology – monuments, research, excavation, survey, etc. What I have discovered is that comics are an extraordinarily suitable medium for…

TRPG Event – Trefonen

Andy Heaton of the TRPG sent in this report: The Trefonen Rural Protection Group (TRPG) hosted it’s “Autumn Speaker Evening 2017” which focussed this year on the Offa’s Dyke monument and long distance footpath that both pass through the heart of our village. In a packed village hall with over 120 of our community in…

Frontiers Past and Present – Journal of the Offa’s Dyke Collaboratory

I’m now working on a new open-access journal as a key endeavour for the Collaboratory. Frontiers Past and Present – Journal of the Offa’s Dyke Collaboratory The idea is to create a journal focusing on the history and archaeology of linear earthworks and other boundaries and frontier works. The journal will also explore the heritage…

Maen Achwyfan and its Landscape

Of direct relevance to the contested frontier landscape of the pre-Norman era is the fascinating cross at Maen Achwyfan, Flintshire. It is close to the Whitford dykes and close to where Offa’s Dyke has been considered by antiquarians as running. Indeed, I just love Maen Achwyfan: a 10th/11th-century cross in Flintshire. It is actually really…

New Publication: Placing the Pillar of Eliseg

At the inaugural Collaboratory workshop in Shrewsbury in April 2017, I presented the key findings of work conducted by Dr Patricia Murrieta-Flores and myself stemming from the Past in its Place ERC-funded project. I’ve discussed various elements of this paper before on on my blog but the final publication is now out in the journal…

New heritage signs at Chirk Castle put Offa’s Dyke back on the map

A year ago I wrote a critical post about ‘Dyke Denial at Chirk Castle‘. Despite being a fan of this wonderful National Trust property, I was disappointed by the low priority given to informing and educating visitors about Offa’s Dyke which runs through the grounds. Visitors enter by car, coach bicycle or on foot, crossing…

Lyonshall

Finding early medieval dykes can be a hit and miss affair, I should know, I did my PhD on the things studying over a hundred examples. Sometimes I seemed to be going round and round in circles on foot or in my car fruitlessly comparing odd small lumps on the ground with antiquarian references to…

Dykes Through Time

Here are details of the 2nd Offa’s Dyke Collaboratory event: a conference session at the 39th Theoretical Archaeology Group conference to be held on the afternoon of Tuesday 19th December at Cardiff University. The session is called: Dykes through Time: Rethinking Early Medieval Linear Earthworks To register for the conference, please follow this link: Cardiff…

Hawthorn Hill

Take a short diversion off the Offa’s Dyke path to the south of Knighton, one can encounter the beauty of Hawthorn Hill. In a previous post I’ve discussed the adjusted-segmented arrangement of the dyke as it navigates the western edge of this hill. Many of those exploring the hill might stick to the dyke and…

New members join the ODC

Following our inaugural workshop at Shrewsbury in April 2017, a number of the attendees contacted the ODC to sign up as members. In addition, we’ve just had our first set of new members who were not at the Shrewsbury workshop. Liam Delaney – HER officer for Herefordshire County Council Professor Andrew Fleming, University of Wales…

Craignant Tower – commemorating Offa’s Dyke

In a previous post, I noted the recent commemoration of the line of Offa’s Dyke as it crosses the Clywedog west of Nant Mill. At that point, a tree has been carved with a sculpture commemorating Offa and ‘his’ dyke. Here I wish to report on another ‘modern’ feature marking Offa’s Dyke. It is probably…

Pen-Y-Gardden hillfort and Offa’s Dyke

Re-posted from Howard’s Archaeodeath blog. Recently, I went on a walk to check out Pen-Y-Gardden (Y Garden) hillfort to the west of Ruabon. The hillfort is presumed to be Iron Age. It is itself is on private land but the public right of way follows a lane around its western and north-western sides. The interior is…

Offa’s Dyke from Carreg-y-big to Craignant

Offa’s Dyke is alive and well, but often found snoring deeply in slumber beneath the surface of modern culture and politics.  To use another mildly implausible analogy, the early medieval linear earthwork, regarded as built by the orders of the Mercian king Offa, is like an iceberg, or perhaps a dormant volcano. It is seemingly…

Offa’s Dyke from Chirk to Craignant

Re-posted from Howard’s Archaeodeath blog. Offa’s Dyke is a late 8th-century linear earthwork (Britain’s longest), attributed to the Mercian ruler Offa (r. 757-796). To understand it, one has to have a copy of Sir Cyril Fox’s 1955 book, the last and only time the monument has been surveyed from one end to the other. This post reflects…

Offa’s Dyke and the Clywedog

I have a long-standing interest in early medieval kingship, kingdoms and communities and their monumental expressions, but very little time and effort spent thinking about and exploring linear earthworks. Hence, my recent conference presentation and ongoing research on Offa’s and Wat’s Dykes in the vicinity of the Vale of Llangollen is a new departure for me. I…

Offa’s Dyke at Chirk Castle

Re-posted from Howard’s Archaeodeath blog I’ve just finished reading Keith Ray and Ian Bapty’s fascinating new book: Offa’s Dyke: Landscape and Hegemony in Eighth-Century Britain, published by Oxbow. Hence, Offa’s Dyke is foremost in my mind. The monument is under threat of destruction along its line – from ignorance, neglect and irresponsible (sometimes criminal) behaviour. It is…

Commemorating Wat’s Dyke at Hope

Re-posted from Professor Williams’s Archaeodeath blog. On a road trip to explore parts of the Vale of Llangollen I stopped at Hope, Flintshire, to inspect a section of the Mercian frontier work known as Wat’s Dyke. On the outskirts of the village to the north-north-west, the dyke is well preserved beneath modern property boundaries beside the Wrexham…

Wat’s Dyke at Erddig

Wat’s Dyke Running for 38 miles, seemingly continuously from the Dee estuary at Basingwerk to Maesbury Marsh south of Oswestry, Wat’s Dyke is the second longest earthwork known from early medieval Britain, only over-shadowed in scale by its neighbour: Offa’s Dyke. As Cyril Fox put it: ‘Wat’s Dyke, throughout its course from the Dee to the…