Offa’s Dyke – Modern Signs on an Ancient Earthwork

A few months back, I walked along one of the more southerly sections of Offa’s Dyke as it follows the eastern side of the River Wye. I was struck but its scale and character of the bank and ditch as it traversed steep slopes and complex topography and would have once dominated the land to…

Offa’s Dyke from Tidenham and the Devil’s Pulpit

Back in March, I visited the Wye Valley to explore sections of Offa’s Dyke as it navigates along the high slopes above the river. I thought this would be the best time of year to investigate it when leaves wouldn’t intercede in my views of the landscape, and hence my visit would enhance my appreciation…

Commemorating Dyke, Park and Path – Offa’s Dyke at Knighton

Previously posted on HW’s Archaeodeath blog. Recently I visited Knighton’s Offa’s Dyke Centre and explored sections of Offa’s Dyke to its north and south. What I gained from this is a clear sense of how this monumental earthwork traversed and controlled the valley of the River Teme. This is one of the sections where Offa’s…

Signs and Memorials on Offa’s Dyke from Panpunton Hill to Cwm-sanahan Hill

Re-posted from Archaeodeath – the blog of Professor Howard Williams Previously I’ve discussed signs and memorials along Offa’s Dyke in the Wye Valley, in Knighton, and around Selattyn and Craignant. I’ve shown how signs serve their practical waymarking functions as well as branding and commemorating simultaneously the ancient earthwork and the Offa’s Dyke Path. I’ve…

The Offa’s Dyke Centre

Re-posted from the Archaeodeath blog of Professor Howard Williams The Offa’s Dyke Centre at Knighton, opened in 1999 and supported by (among others) the Offa’s Dyke National Trail, is located on the edge of Knighton, Powys. It has already become one of my all-time favourite museums/heritage centres, despite the fact that I have so far…

Adjusted-Segmented Construction of Offa’s Dyke on Hawthorn Hill

This is re-posted from the Archaeodeath blog of Howard Williams Rather than sinuous or straight, in many places Offa’s Dyke is built of short straight segments. In their recent book Offa’s Dyke: Landscape and Hegemony in Eighth-Century Britain, Ray and Bapty identify a series of places where this distinctive form of construction is in evidence….

Feathers on Offa’s Dyke

This is a re-blog from Howard Williams’s Archaeodeath blog. Whilst recently walking the Offa’s Dyke path between Discoed, Powys and Rushock Hill, Herefordshire, I got to see some terrific birdlife, including a mistle thrush, linnet, multiple wren encounters, a reed warbler, a redstart, a wheatear, sparrows, great tits, blue tits and so on, as well…

Placing the Pillar of Eliseg

I’m very pleased to announce my latest publication: a collaboration between Dr Patricia Murrieta-Flores and myself stemming from the Past in its Place ERC-funded project.I’ve discussed various elements of this paper before on this blog but here it is in its final published form. Placing the Pillar of Eliseg explores movement and memory through the landscape…

CFP: Dykes Through Time: Rethinking Early Medieval Linear Earthworks

The 39th Theoretical Archaeology Group annual conference is taking place at Cardiff University, 18-20 December 2017. Details are here. The following session has been accepted by the TAG Committee on behalf of the Offa’s Dyke Collaboratory. Interested in speaking? Submit your proposed titles and proposals  to the session organiser – Professor Howard Williams (howard.williams@chester.ac.uk) by…

The Offa’s Dyke Collaboratory: Origins, Purpose and Parameters

These notes have been prepared to accompany a brief prefatory talk at the Offa’s Dyke Collaboratory Workshop held at The University Centre, Shrewsbury, on Friday 28th April 2017.   Origins The present initiative to promote new research and field investigation into the Mercian-British frontier (broadly) between the Dee and the Severn estuaries in the borderlands…

Offa’s Dyke: some notes towards a Research Agenda

Introduction Recent decades have seen a proliferation in the formulation of Research Agenda in British archaeology. The best of these have helped focus study and co-ordinate efforts. Far too many, however, especially before the year 2000, comprised either vague ‘wish-lists’ with no realistic chance of fulfilment, or have been so closely-articulated that they have inhibited…

Offa’s Dyke: Notes towards a Research Design in 100 Questions

Introduction There are many questions that remain to be answered about both Offa’s Dyke and the British-Mercian frontier, for the latter especially for the several decades either side of the year 800AD. As was explained in Chapter 2 of Offa’s Dyke: Landscape and Hegemony in Eighth-Century Britain (Keith Ray and Ian Bapty, Windgather Press, 2016,…

Welcome to the ODC Website

Welcome to the Offa’s Dyke Collaboratory (ODC) website. In coming months, we will be populating the site with information and resources about new research on Offa’s Dyke, Wat’s Dyke and early medieval western Britain. This first post is to highlight you to the above static pages that provide information about the Offa’s Dyke Collaboratory: About…